Review: Xbox One X is the Gamer’s Dream Come True

When the Xbox One (X1) was released in 2013, I did not expect much from the lower to mid-tier level hardware components. Compared to what was available on the market, the X1 was designed with a somewhat lackluster CPU and GPU. Moreover, it was equipped with a measly 8GB of RAM.

I was not disappointed though, since internal hardware in consoles had not quite kept up with higher-powered components available for PCs. Consoles were designed with a lower monetary barrier to attract customers.

Gamers who wanted to experience games with cutting-edge visual effects and higher resolution could invest in the latest and greatest hardware components for a beefy PC.

It came as a surprise then, that Project Scorpio, officially named, Xbox One X (Scorpio), is actually a powerful machine on the higher end of the spectrum. Run by an overclocked CPU, more powerful GPU, and 12GB of much faster RAM, Scorpio is indeed a worthy successor.

Quite honestly, I was skeptical when Microsoft announced that Scorpio would be able to perform at a whopping 6 TFLOPS, far surpassing the X1’s 1.31 TFLOPS. Even after Digital Foundry released their previews of Scorpio’s hardware, I took it with a grain of salt. I just had to see it for myself.

After using my Scorpio for the past three weeks, I am a believer. In fact, I am so incredibly impressed at how games look on Scorpio, I no longer see any reason to play games on my high-end PC, except when using my Oculus Rift.

Even if a multiplatform game costs less on PC (which is most often the case for older titles), I will probably opt to buy it on Xbox. Not only will the game look nearly as good on PC (in some cases, better due to HDR), but I’ll also enjoy the benefits of Xbox Live and Achievements.

Some developers have “enhanced” their titles to take full advantage of Scorpio’s horsepower. This may mean higher resolutions, more visual effects, higher or more stable FPS, and HDR. Even games that have not been given the “enhanced” treatment can look better on Scorpio.

It must be a true joy as a developer to see all of your work being fully appreciated as it was intended. Scorpio brings out the best of every game.

In addition to the visual upgrades that Scorpio offers, games generally load faster, so there’s less downtime in between levels and games. Let’s not forget that like the Xbox One S, Scorpio comes equipped with a 4K Blu-Ray player.

The console’s case itself is tiny, yet dense. It is dwarfed by my original One X. Scorpio even includes the power supply inside of the console unit. It truly is an engineering marvel.

Scorpio retails for $499, and it is worth every penny. Even if you do not have a 4K TV, games will look dramatically better when played on Scorpio.

The Xbox One X represents the fulfillment of the promise that Microsoft made when it launched the first Xbox One four years ago. It also perhaps represents a shift in priorities at Microsoft. Instead of cutting corners with hardware, it pushed the envelope.

Many, including Microsoft, have said that the Xbox One X is not a next generation console. Microsoft has actually stated that the concept of generations is perhaps even over, but for all intents and purposes, the Xbox One X is a de facto next gen Xbox.

This review was not sponsored by Microsoft in any way.